About your Search

20100401
20100430
STATION
WRC (NBC) 187
MSNBC 172
WBAL (NBC) 128
FOXNEWS 38
CSPAN 10
CSPAN2 8
HLN 8
CNBC 6
WETA 6
WUSA (CBS) 6
CNN 5
WBFF (FOX) 3
WJLA (ABC) 3
WJZ (CBS) 3
WMPT (PBS) 3
WMAR (ABC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 589
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 589 (some duplicates have been removed)
that bo has done it again. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it was a spectacular explosion, a massive fire and genuine human tragedy involving 11 missing men. tonight, the oil platform that was on fire off the coast of louisiana is gone. it sank today into the waters of the gulf of mexico, and the first thing a lot of people thought about was all that oil. this can't be good for the environment. it's where we start off tonight with nbc's ron mott. ron, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you. we are at the naval air station just outside new orleans which are headquarters for the coast guard operation. they are looking at this as a search and rescue mission, but they are acknowledging they are reaching the tail end of the search for survivors. this morning, the fire that's raged out of control since tuesday night's explosion claimed what was left of the deepwater horizon in yet another explosion as the suspended rig which isn't anchored to the ocean floor sank beneath the surface of the gulf. the air search for 1
a start. this is not an easy fix. mike taibbi, nbc news, new york. >>> now to jobs. and with 15 million americans looking for work, president obama warned today that even after yesterday's encouraging report showing employers added 162,000 jobs last month, economic recovery is still far from a done deal. >> we've begun to reverse the devastating slide. but we have a long way to go to repair the damage from this recession. and then we'll continue to be my focus every single day. >> for more on what almost all the experts say will be a long and slow recovery, we are now joined by cnbc's trish regan. trish, weust heard from the president that the news is good. but not great. so what do economists say needs to happen to me this sustained growth? >> peter, we need jobs. that's the reality of the situation. but those jobs are very hard to come by. keep this in mind. it takes 100,000 jobs being added to the economy every month just to break even, just to keep the unemployment rate at 9.7%. so if you really want to see that rate start to come down, you are talking about adding 200,000, 300,00 j
successful test flights, the flight ban continues at least until tomorrow evening. tom aspell, nbc news, london. >>> mark rosencur, who we just saw in tom's report, is a former ntsb chairman, now an nbc analyst. mark, those test flights were encouraging. depending on where this cloud goes, tomorrow could tell a different story. how will we know when it is safe to fly? >> lester, everyone is eager to get into the air. clearly the passengers, clearly the carriers themselves. but the ultimate decision is going to come from the aviation officials that are in europe and they'll be making those decisions based on the data they receive from their weather services. >> how about the pressure factor here? if i'm a passenger sitting in an airport now for the fourth day and i just watch that plane and those planes take off from europe safely, the pressure's building from that and there's the financial pressure the airlines are feeling. will that play into the decision to go? >> i don't believe so. they want to get into the air. there's no doubt about that. the aviation authorities want to put the a
way of doing business. lee cowan, nbc news, los angeles. >>> a word about that other financial crisis under way in europe. which is struggling under a mountain of debt. today spain had its credit rating downgraded. yesterday it was portugal and greece. the euro dropped to a one-year low. this is all of great concern to president obama, the white house told us today. administration officials say they are following this closely. on wall street here in new york today, stocks rebounded a bit after yesterday's big selloff. the dow up more than 53 points. >>> at the supreme court a ruling on a contentious question involving church and state in a world war i era cross in the mohave desert on government land. a lower court ruled the cross had to be removed. today the supreme court in a 5-4 ruling said sometimes a cross is just a sign of respect for the dead not a statement of any kind of religious faith. so it looks like the cross is there to say. >>> it has happened again. a public figure has been caught being himself, making what he thought was a private remark picked up by a live microphon
captioning institute] >> jim popkin who worked mostly through nbc nightly news where he worked extensively with workers and whistleblowers. i've represented whistleblowers since 1984 and i've been working with the press ever since, when it is my turn to speak, many whistleblower cases are either one in the press where the employer or the government agency backs down or at least the whistleblower can get a sense of vindication by having their issues resolved and call public attention. whistleblowers have worked with news media from the beginning of the republic and hope will continue to work with the news media and that the association is as successful as it can be. >> our first speaker is rich, a producer with "60 minutes." for 22 years he has been a producer of the show. that show needs no introduction. he has won awards for journalism including five emmy awards. he has covered a wide range of stories on terrorism, the middle east, and exposeas about government and corporate misconduct. he did an extensive show on an investigation on the anthrax debauched f.b.i. anthrax investigation conc
stranded, a new blow for a fragile economy. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. there are ominous new signs from iceland tonight that the eruption of that volcano which has crippled european air traffic is far from over. scientists just back from a flyover of the exploding mountain say it could continue for weeks. tonight that towering plume of volcanic ash continues to straddle vital air routes leaving airports from britain bryto ukraine closed and stranding passengers in virtually every corner of the world. we have the latest on the eruption and the fallout. let's begin with nbc's chris jansing in iceland. she flew over the volcano today and joins us now from a farm just outside the mountain area. chris? >> reporter: good evening, lester. today was actually the first time since this volcano started erupting on wednesday that the skies cleared enough for scientists to go up in the air and make those critical assessments about how long these eruptions and thus the disruptions might continue. we took an expert along with us on our helicopter ride, and i can only
someone attempt to poison the president in germany? "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. tonight they have set fire to the gulf of mexico, at least the part of it where the oil is in the water, part of a giant effort to contain an oil slick making its way slowly toward the louisiana coastline. where that drilling platform once stood before sinking there is still an active deep-sea oil well, a mile under water, spewing out 42,000 gallons every day until it's plugged. our chief environmental affairs correspondent is in delacroix, louisiana. ann, this burn is taking place behind you anywhere from, what, 50 to 30 miles out? >> reporter: right. far enough off the coast so officials say we will not be able to see that black plume that will come up off the water. tonight, brian, with time running short and the weather poised to turn against them, oil and government teams are trying a new tactic to try to contain this spill. fighting a wind pattern that could bring the spill ashore friday night crews prepare to ignite a controlled burn. >> i
offers a chance to repair soured relations with moscow. nbc news political director and chief white house correspondent chuck chad joins us with more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you said, president obama just arrived here a little less than a half-hour ago. he's now in some private meetings both with the leaders of the czech republic and then also with russian president medvedev. they will sign this treaty in about an hour or so. here are the basic details. it's a reduction of approximately 30% of both the arsenals of the united states and of russia, both countries will limit their nuclear arsenals to 1,500 warheads each, only 700 long range weapons for each country can be deployed at any one time. the only sticking point, and it's still there -- we won't hear much talk about it today -- has to do with missile defense. the russians issued a unilateral statement saying they could pull out of the treaty at any time if the u.s. continues with missile defense that somehow upsets the balance of power between the two countries. the u.s. says whatever plans they have won't do th
is gone tonight. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. one reporter today put it this way, the clouds have parted. more jobs were added to american payrolls last month. and in this economy, that is good news. there's no other way to slice it and the president couldn't wait to get out on the road and talk about it. while there are still so many americans out there looking for work, some of them have stopped looking. there were also predictions today that something of a corner has been turned here and recovery might now start to feel real to more americans. here's the number, 162,000 new jobs last month. the unemployment rate held steady at 9.7%. we'll begin our coverage here tonight at the white house with our chief white house correspondent chuck todd. chuck, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. it's the type of jobs report this country and the white house has been waiting for more forethan a year. a possible sign that not only have we hit bottom on ts jobs issue, but maybe things are starting look up. >> we are beginning to t
be used. in fact, since january, the number of people on it has more than doubled. pete williams, nbc news, washington. >>> this, of course, is good friday. in a service at the vatican today there was an unusual defense of the pope and the growing sexual abuse scandals in the catholic church. nbc's anne thompson is in rome again for us tonight. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the world is still waiting to hear from pope benedict on this issue, but comments from another church official have only added to the vatican's problems. pope benedict leading the way of the cross. the event at the heart of christianity. jesus dying for the sins of man, but the outcry over the priests dominated this good friday. priests who sexually abused children and church leaders who covered it up, perhaps even the pope. those accusations brought a controversial defense from the pope's personal preacher at today's service he compared the attacks on benedict to the persecution of the jews. >> translator: they know from experience what it means to be victims of collective violence, and also because o
for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. a central question in the news tonight, is it legal, is it right for a police officer to come up to you and ask you to produce i.d. if you're suspected of entering the country illegally? this is playing out tonight in the state of arizona where there are 500,000 immigrants and the governor just signed the single toughest law in the nation against illegal immigration. governor says she's fixing a crisis the federal government refuses to fix. she's going against the president on this one. our report tonight from jose diaz-balart from phoenix. >> reporter: late this afternoon, arizona governor jan brewer signed the controversial bill, the toughest state law against illegal immigration in the country. >> i decided to sign senate bill 1070 into law because, though many people disagree, i firmly believe it represents what's best for arizona. >> reporter: with her signature, arizona is now in direct conflict with the white house, where the president welcomed the country's newest americans sworn in today as u.s. citizens. mr. obama used the oc
disaster. anne thompson, nbc news, robert, louisiana. >>> when "nightly news" continues this sunday, why would so many people walk right by a man in desperate need of help? the good samaritan who paid a terrible price on the streets of new york and it's all caught on tape. >>> and mother nature still reminding us who's boss tonight in iceland. at my family barbeque. join the fun (announcer) for people with copd, including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both, great news. advair helps significantly improve lung function. while nothing can reverse copd, advair is different from most other medications because it contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator, working together to help you breathe better. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. i'm glad you came, grandma. oh,
positions for nbc news over a 14 year period. he oversaw a team of correspondence that broke major stories for nbc news on politics, wall street scandals, intelligence scandals, law enforcement controversies. he was an on-air correspondent and his stories appeared on nbc today show, the weekend nightly news, cnbc, msnbc. he has won four national awards for outstanding journalism. he has won two edward murrow award and was a finalist for the national magazine award. the american journalism review profiled him as one of washington's most enterprising journalist. he is now the founder of a media consulting group. it is my honor to have him here. i am looking forward to his remarks. >> thank you. [applause] despite his kind words today, i thought i would be a little country in and talk about whistle-blowers. -- contrarian and talk about whistle-blowers. i was a journalist for 25 years. during that time, i produced a report on a couple dozen stories that involve whistle-blowers. i interviewed and talk to and ultimately declined to do stories on probably two or three times the number of people w
down our economy. and the plan would put new consumer protections in place. i'm steve handlesman, nbc news, capitol hill. >>> news 4 at 4:00 is just getting started. armed and dangerous. >> up next at 4:15, what went down at an airport president obama was leaving from that landed one man behind bars. >> then at 4:30, the tragic story of an innocent bystander left for dead on city streets right in front of people who refused to help. >> and at 4:45, a new study by the cdc says some chronic health problems are going undiagnosed and you could be at risk. >>> an ohio man who showed up armed an an airport that president obama was using is still behind bars this afternoon. dozens of people walked by but no one helped prince william. >> reporter: the surveillance tape is chilling. this woman is mugged. that's when police say a good samaritan jumped in to help. the mugger stabbed him and ran away. the injured samaritan chases him before collapsing on the sidewalk. over the next hour and 20 minutes, more than 25 people passed by and did nothing. in one case, a man took a picture on his cell ph
to society gets repaid. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. you might not have been aware of it. there is a good chance you didn't feel what happened but when the closing bell sounded on wall street, a milestone was reached, the dow closed above 11 thoon. the experts are fond of terms like breaking through the 11,000 barrier, but how will it help millions of americans who couldn't feel any farther away from wall street in economic terms? it is where we begin with david favre with nbc. a graphic i want to show you, the last time we were here, 11,000 and the big dip, 9/11, strong runup to 14,000 in '07, the economic crash, march 9th about exactly a year ago. here we are at 11,000. the question is what does it mean? >> it is only a number, brian. it is certainly indicative of how far we've come in the last year. a little over a year ago panic reigned in our financial market, that was reflected in a dow at 6600. hasn't been there in 12 years. we have come a long way since then. people who watch this show or looked at their 401(k)s or iras
scrambled to escort the plane into denver. nbc news confirmed there was no bomb nor was there any other explosive on that passenger or on the plane. craig melvin is at national airport now with more on this. >> reporter: you said it there, no shoe bomb, no explosives. the man may have been smoking in the bathroom aboard that flight. what we do know it's been a hairy situation as investigators try to find out exactly what happened. united 663 left reagan national this afternoon, 157 passengers onboard. six crew members. 20 to 30 minutes before the flight was set to land, someone smelled smoke. a flight attendant or an air marshal. an air marshal noticed good night emerging from the lavor try. they questioned the guy they were not sure whether he said he was trying to light his shoe on fire or put a cigarette out with his issue. f-16s were scrambled and escorted that boeing jet to the airport there where it sat in a remote location for some time. we learned the man's name is muhammad delqu almadi from qatar. all of this follows the infamous christmas day attempt by the nigerian man who tr
. martha kramer, associate editor of the kipling your letter. luke russert, nbc news correspondent for congress and a new member of the national press club and genie friar, veteran associated press newsmen and a member of the national press club. [applause] kathleen sebelius, the and of the health of the apartment of human services lead the principal agency charged with keeping americans healthy and 80,000 employee institutions have been the focus of some of the obama administration's top priorities. as the country's highest-ranking health officials she has been a powerful voice in reforming the health insurance system along with coordinating response to the 2009 swine flu virus and it range of services from health care to child care to energy assistance during the economic downturn. kathleen sebelius whose father was governor of ohio and whose father in law with the kansas congressman has decades of political experience in her own right. she served in the kansas house of representatives until 1995 followed by eight years of the insurance commissioner where she was selected as publ
>>> i'm ann curry. for all of us here at nbc news, good night. country in shock. poland mourns its president and dozens of other officials killed in this weekend's tragic plane crash. >>> they bid fair well to the home of the dallas a cowboys. >>> a triple crown as phil mickelson wins his third green jacket. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with a tragic mistake. investigators have determined that method can call problems did not cause the crash that left polish president kaczynski and others dead in russia. now there will be an inquiry as to why the pilot did not heed the advice of the air traffic controllers who told him not to attempt a landing in dense fochlgt kaczynski's body is now back home where a tearful nation still in stock and a vigil continues around the world. nbc's jim maceda has the story. >> reporter: it began in russia where he led a brief ceremony before sending off the remains of the powe ligs president to his grieving homeland. two hours later kaczynski's family and others not on the fl
news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. first reports that a man from a middle eastern country tried to set off a shoe bomb from a flight last night from washington to denver. first reports are often wrong and so was this one, but it triggered a massive scare that spread through the flying skies across the country. fighter jets were scrambled, passengers were frozen in place. in the end, there was no bomb, just a combination of wrongdoing on the part of the passenger and misunderstanding in the post 9/11 era of zero tolerance in our skies. our report on what did happen from our justice correspondent pete williams. he's where the flight originate at national airport in washington. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, it happened on a united airlines flight that took here from reagan national airport. the trouble began when a passenger tried to sneak a smoke onboard and made a flippant, and very unfortunate remark. it was a harrowing night for 157 passengers aboard a united airlines flight, so it ended safely. >> it was quite an inconve
the mine continue to wait anxiously. nbc news has also learned new information about the mine operator. that inspectors ordered parts of the mine or all of it closed on 61 occasions over the last 15 months, more than 100 times since the year 2000, and five of those instances were because of what the inspectors called imminent danger issues. lastly, president obama ordered an initial assessment of what went wrong next week. he also wants to make sure this never happens again. >> continues to be such a heartbreaking story out of west virginia. tom costello, thanks. >>> we turn to the big news story overseas today. it came out of prague. the u.s. and russia, the two world superpowers signed a new treaty to reduce their stock piles of nuclear weapons. a new start for two old coal cold warriors. our chief white house correspondent chuck todd is traveling with the the president. >> reporter: receiving a red carpet welcome, president obama came to prague thursday to sign a new nuclear arms treaty with the world's only other nuclear superpower russia. >> this ceremony is a testament to the tru
new offensive is about to get under way. nbc's john yang is in afghanistan. >> reporter: chanting death to america, protestors burned tires to block the main road out of kandahar. it followed a predawn incident where a u.s. patrol fired on a civilian passenger bus. at least five people died, one of them a woman. 18 others were wounded including this man. when we were close to the convoy, he said, suddenly they opened fire at us. afghan and nato officials say the bus was west of kandahar heading to herat. there were conflicting reports but the u.s. military said the bus approached the slow-moving patrol from behind and soldiers tried to wash the driver with a flashlight, three flares and hand signals. the bus kept getting closer and they opened fire. the bus driver said he was trying to stop when the shooting began. since last summer troops have killed 30 civilians around vehicle check points or military convoys. coalition commanders acknowledge none of them turned out to be a threat. >> we are in the ninth year of conflict. the number of civilian casualties are growing year by yea
. leanne gregg, nbc news. >>> in washington, the fourth time was a charm for democrats last night, breaking through a three-day republican filibuster against moving forward on the proposed overhaul of the nation's financial system. now both sides are gearing up to debate the details of financial regulation with the ultimate goal of preventing another economic crisis somewhere down the road. nbc's steve handelsman has more. >> reporter: barack obama was in illinois, campaigning for his version of financial reform when republicans dropped their legislative blockade. >> it appears an agreement may be in hand to allow this debate to move forward on the senate floor on this critical issue. >> reporter: on this week's campaign-style midwest swing, the president's been saying finreg would mean no more tax bailouts of banks, would mean new regulation of wall street, and new consumer loan moves in saying that we need all of that now. >> the bottom line is consumers have to be protected, we have to end bailouts, we've got to make sure that these trading practices are out in the open. >> reporter: rep
. >>> how much did goldman sachs just make? "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. we may be at this for months. no one knows what this volcano in iceland is going to do. tonight after a scare over a new cloud of volcanic ash, the airlines are bound and determined to get back up in the air. and tonight we've seen the first few flights land at london's heathrow airport. this was the scene there tonight. european air space slowly comes back to life again. we can see it on live flight tracking systems like this one. yellow icons are jets in the air. you can almost see the ash line through europe north to south. while ireland and parts of germany are still restricted, others countries are coming back online after six days of no flights. not knowing what the future of this volcano may bring. we begin our coverage with dawna friesen at london heathrow airport. >> reporter: good evening, brian. here at heathrow for a while now the only sound you could hear was the sound of birds singing. tonight the familiar roar of aircraft engines i
in the air. >>> and the latest outrage in the air. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television it was a catastrophic explosion deep under ground and the loss of life is staggering, even for the coal mining industry in west virginia that has seen so much tragedy over the years. tonight, 25 miners are dead. another four are still missing. there's a herculean and urgent effort under way by rescuers to drill several holes as deep as 1200 feet down to release trapped gas inside the mine. our correspondents have been covering this tragedy ever since first word yesterday that something had gone wrong. we begin with nbc's tom costello at the scene. >> reporter: we still don't know what caused the spark that may have ignited this explosion. maybe a spark from one of those trol lees that move men up and down the mine shaft. of the 25 miners they know are dead, 18 have not been identified. their bodies are still inside the mine, along with the four missing miners. the hope is that they made it to shelter with food, with water, with oxygen. through the night, rescue wo
. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. an enormous environmental disaster is in progress on the gulf coast tonight. this started with the explosion, the loss of 11 souls onboard that drilling platform which then sank. oil is coming out of three different places. it's spewing into the water at a rate of 5,000 barrels a day. that could increase to 25,000 barrels. along the shoreline, the environmental disaster is starting. the oil is coming onshore. it's going to keep coming. it will play out over the next few days. the weather is now contributing. winds from the south are driving the oil north toward the shore. high waves and swells in the gulf have overtopped some of the inflatable booms in some cases. while the winds might change, there is nothing to stop this disaster. this image already today is the one so many people were hoping they would not see. we have a team of correspondents covering this story, beginning again tonight with our chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. anne, good evening. >> reporter: good ev
that all too often doesn't end this well. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. he is a genuine american hero. neil armstrong was the first man on the moon. since those years he receded into a quiet life in america. there is no neil armstrong action figure, no chain of restaurants, and while he's walked on the moon, he's never been tempted to dance with the stars. our veteran space correspondent jay barbree exclusively obtained a letter written by neil armstrong and several other icons of the space program. it directly challenges president obama's reported plans to idle the u.s.-manned space program. astronauts armstrong, jim lovell and gene cernan write, "without the skill and experience that actual spacecraft operation provides, the usa is far too likely to being on a long downhill slide to mediocrity." and on this anniversary of the space disaster, it is the choice a president and nation must face. that's where we begin with tom costello at the kennedy space center in florida. tom, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good e
only to be stuck again. mother nature has clearly made her point. stephanie gosk, nbc news, nowhere near home. >>> one other angle here tonight. we've heard about how that volcanic ash can damage a jet engine, what about human lungs? what are the health effects for those who especially have to live alongside it. some answers on that point tonight from our chief science correspondent robert bazell in iceland. >> reporter: the plume was 8,000 feet high, a dangerous mixture molten earth, including iron, silica, magnesium and bromide. this was far less than the monstrous eruptions over the weekend, with plumes as high as 30,000 feet and massive amounts of steam from glaciers melt into the volcano. this doctor who practices in the shadow of the volcano worries on the effects of the ash on patients in this rural area, especially those with heart and lung conditions. >> when you breathe it in, it is mechanically very irritating for your lungs. >> reporter: his biggest concern is for farmers who refuse to leave or stay indoors, fearing for their precious livestock. >> we were very much afra
bailout fund here. >> reporter: the familiar sound of partisan warfare. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >> the president is expected to name is nominee next month. >>> funeral services were held today for civil rights leader benjamin hooks. hooks died last thursday in his memphis, ten, home after a long illness. family, friends, political leaders from across the country attended the service. hooks was a former attorney, judge, and direct oo oor of the naacp. many people credit him with reviving the civil rights organization. by the time he left the group in 1992 the membership had grown by thousands. benjamin hooks was 85 years old. >>> "news4 at 4:00" is just getting started this afternoon. coming up, auto anxiety. >> next at 4:15, major automaker on the road to recovery as a new poll is out on americans' opinions of foreign and u.s. cars. >>> at 4:positive, the desperate search now under way for nearly a dozen oil rig workers in the gulf after it >>> the washington caps are hoping to win their third straight playoff game tonight. they take on the montreal canadiens in gam
of their friends may never make it home. jay gray, nbc news, belle chasse, louisiana. >>> well, president obama took his message of financial reform to the source yesterday, making his case on wall street that the risky practices that led to the economic crisis must be stopped, this as negotiations for a bipartisan deal on the financial reform in the senate could spill into the weekend. majority leader harry reid announced yesterday democrats will move forward regardless of a procedure move on monday. nbc's steve handelsman has more on the president's tough talk on wall street. >> reporter: in new york near where the nation's banking system nearly failed, president obama demanded new financial regulations to prevent future meltdowns. >> the goal is to make certain the taxpayers are never again on the hook because a firm is deemed too big to fail. >> reporter: but before mr. obama could end his speech, house republicans made the charge. >> the bill that we have in front of us will actually provide permanent bailouts. >> reporter: and john boehner warned of -- >> -- a government takeover of the e
reality here is that nothing will ever be the same. jay gray, nbc news, yazoo city, mississippi. >>> president obama and vice president biden were in west virginia yesterday to pay tribute to the 29 miners who lost their lives earlier this month in one of the nation's worst coal mine disasters in decades. he told the families of the work es the nation will honor their memory by improving the mine safety. nbc's brian mooar has that story. ♪ >> reporter: in west virginia an emotional farewell to the 29 miners lost in the worst mine accident this nation has seen in 40 years. president obama joined by vice president biden was there to pay his respects to those who perished. >> well, these miners lived as they died, in pursuit of the american dream. >> reporter: and he paid tribute to those who go back into the mines every single day. one by one, the lost miners' names were read alod. >> rex lane mullins. >> reporter: their family members filed in, and a helmet was placed on a white cross. it's been nearly three weeks since the deadly explosion in upper big branch. the mine's opera
saturday. nbc's jay gray has the story. >> it keeps getting bigger and wider. >> reporter: new video shows the massive tornado that leveled yazoo city. the national weather service believes it was a mile and a half wild with winds up to 160 miles an hour it. >> was on the ground about 40 miles here in this county, but apparently for about 150 miles through the state. >> reporter: the devastation is overwhelming. the latest numbers from mississippi emergency management tell part of the horrific story. 686 homes and buildings damaged or destroyed more than 300 of those in yazoo city. >> it was just a lot of noise and debris, and you could hear stuff coming off the roof. you could hear the front glass window breaking. >> reporter: ef live corley and her husband ran for shelter in the hallway in the home it. >> seemed like it lasted a long time, and then it was over. it was gone. and then shortly after that the sun started coming up like nothing had ever happened. >> reporter: but the painful reality here is that nothing will ever be the same. jay gray, nbc news, yazoo city, mississippi. >>> p
>> nice try,hough, dan. >> that's it for now. "nbc kwp nightly news" coming up next. >> we hope you will join us for "news4 at >>> on our broadcast tonight, new rules of the road for cars and trucks. what it's going to cost you and why they're doing it. >>> the record rains in new england are over, but the damage is not. >>> who are we? today is census day. we'll tell you why they're worried they're not getting an accurate count. >>> the rich list. while '09 was a rough year for a lot of americans, some had a record pay day. >>> no fooling. there's been a change. a city in kansas is named google. if you don't believe it, you can look it up on topeka. "nightly news" this first of april begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. doesn't it always seem to happen this way? we were told today oil prices are suddenly up to 18-month highs. that means gas prices will rise just in time for the warm weather driving season. just yesterday, president obama talked about balancing our need for new energy, things like offshore drilling with the environment, and ton
-blowers. speakers include 60 minutes producer and former nbc news investigative producer. the national whistle-blowers legal defense and education fund hosted the event brit -- hosted the event. >> he is a distinguished french investigative journalist with the post brith he is a former executive director of the washington times. he worked extensively with sources and whistle-blowers. will have more extensive introduction to recall upon them. i have represented whistle blowers since 1984 and i have been working with the press ever sense -- ever since. the whistleblower can get a sense of vindication by having their issues resolved. whistle-blowers have worked with the news media from the beginning of the republic and i hope that they will continue to work with the news media. our first speaker is the producer for "60 minutes." he has been a producer for 22 years. that show needs no introduction. he has won awards for journalism, including five any awards. he has covered a wide range of stories on terrorism, the middle east, and exposes about government. and corporate misconduct. he did an exten
for passing counterfeit cash. nbc's ron allen is here now. ron, we live in new york city, so to give people perspective, this child is left in one of the busiest places you could wander into. >> at a church by a woman, taken in by the police in the rectory. he's okay, in the hands of the new york city police who are taking care of him. the note was for a police detective in florida. the mother is in jail for counterfeiting with a boyfriend. they tried to pawn a $100 that was phony. the clerk got suspicious, alerted police and they found $5,000 in counterfeit money in the mom's car back in florida. she apparently had put the child in the custody of a friend, who had two children in florida. they apparently drove to new york. it's suspected that those are the two people who dropped the boy off at st. patrick's. crazy story. those two, by the way, are also wanted in the counterfeiting case back in florida. >> now that the boy is safe, where is he now? >> he's in the hands of youth services here in new york. i imagine at a hospital or foster home being well taken care of. >> what about this cou
or terrorists from getting the bomb. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, at the nuclear summit in washington. >>> the white house moved quickly yesterday to squelch widening speculation that secretary of state hillary clinton could be nominated to the u.s. supreme court. however, there are plenty of other candidates to replace the retiring justice john paul stevens, so who will president obama choose? and when? as nbc's brian moore reports, it's destined to be a fight for an already divided capitol hill. >> reporter: the retirement of justice john paul stevens gives president obama another chance to put a mark on the highest court in the land. it also sets the stage for an extraordinary confirmation battle. >> if he picks an activist judge, i don't care whether the activist judge is liberal or conservative, we ought to do everything in our power to defeat that person. >> reporter: if the president replaces a liberal justice with a liberal nominee, republicans are promising a fight. and democrats aren't giving ground, either. >> i'm going to assume that everybody's going to be responsible, ev
. >>> and baggage break, some good news from the airlines regarding outrage over fees. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today we begin with the holding pattern. planes in some european countries are taking off today, but with the sky still unstable, thanks to volcanic ash in iceland, it's unclear how many will actually take off. european officials hope to get half of all scheduled flights in the air today, but travel to and from europe remains mostly paralyzed this morning. meanwhile the aviation industry is losing some $200 million a day while millions of passengers are still stranded. nbc's francis kuo has our reports. >> reporter: thousands of travelers can't get on a plane but they're all in the same boat. >> we're in limbo right now. we are. >> reporter: it's the worst time for air travel since the sept 11th attacks. for the fourth day a massive ash cloud halted travel across much of europe and the other side of the atlantic is feeling the trickle effect. many europeans are in washington, d.c. for the world's largest geography conven
virtually nothing on everything she needs. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. a slow-motion environmental disaster is taking place in the waters of the gulf of mexico. crude oil is leaking into the sea water at a rate of 42,000 gallons a day. that's every day, that's right now. while the scramble is on to cap it, we are in a strange period of waiting and watching. as the slick of crude oil makes its way north toward land, it is now 30 miles away from shore. this started, of course, with the catastrophic explosion of the drilling platform, the loss of 11 workers and now this. our chief environmental correspondent ann thompson is in delacroix, louisiana. ann, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. 50,000 feet under the sea work is going on around the clock to find the shutoff switch to stop the leak that threatens to stain hundreds of miles of coastlines in four states. today in the gulf of mexico time is the enemy and above the battleline it is obvious. the oil spill contains 1,800 square miles, an area bigger than
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 589 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)